Improved FDO Organization Search: Delivering you better ways to find funding

Organization search just got even easier in new FDO. We listened to the valuable feedback of FDO subscribers and worked hard to redesign your search by organization experience. Our goal is to continuously evolve FDO to ensure we bring you the best grant prospecting tool available.

What’s new?

Use the Organization Name search box to look for a Foundation or peer Grant Recipient*.  When you enter an organization name, a full list of organizations will appear. This new layout is much easier to navigate, to ensure you can easily find organizations. You can now define if you want to see Grantmakers only or Recipients only, or both.  

To view a profile directly, click on the flyout icon in the top right hand corner. đź’ˇTip: You may also select multiple organizations and all will appear in your search results.

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We look forward to sharing other future FDO developments with you all. Happy fundraising!   

*Recipient profiles available in Professional subscription only

May 21, 2019

A Foundation Insider’s 8 Tips to Help You Win Your Next Grant

GettyImages-171335460One of my favorite sections in the revised edition of my book the Ultimate Insider’s Guide to Winning Foundation Grants is called “The Grant Seeker’s Reality Check.” In 10 brief chapters I examine, from the vantage point of one who served for 40 years as a foundation CEO, a host of dos and don’ts when preparing and submitting proposals. 

You’ll discover, for instance, the four things you should never do when approaching foundations, the five mistakes many if not most applicants make, and seven ways to increase the chance of your proposal receiving full attention. In this space, I’ll share a handful of suggestions to increase the likelihood of your next proposal getting funded. 

1. BE INFORMED

To insure you’re targeting the correct funder, obtain and study their grants list for the past three years. Pay attention to more than the organizations that received support. It will also be helpful to know the lowest, highest, and typical amounts granted, the grant type (for example, general support versus project support), and the duration of the award—single versus multi-year. 

đź’ˇFundraising tip: FDO Professional will give you access to a funder’s complete grant history to help you prioritize your prospecting efforts. 

2. BE CONCRETE

Funders want to know what they’re getting for their money. That’s why so many of the items we buy come in transparent packaging. Your proposal should be a clear container showing exactly what will result from the funder’s investment. Concrete, measurable results will provide core reasons for funders to support you. 

3. BE JUDICIOUS

So often, in the rush and stress of completing a funding request, the proposal writer is faced with decisions about what to include. There’s a natural but counterproductive tendency to pile on information, perhaps with the thought that bulk is impressive. The end result can be a mammoth and dense proposal that works against the goal of creating enthusiasm for your work. When in doubt of including a piece of correspondence or documentation, don’t. 

4. BE REALISTIC

When it comes to presenting your budget, you’re indicating that you know what resources are needed to achieve the results you want, and that you can access and deploy these resources efficiently. Are you absolutely sure the amounts you list are prudent? Not only should your budget add up—and avoid simple math errors—but it also has to support the logic of the proposal’s narrative. For example, a $100,000 budget to reconstruct 16 flooded houses won’t make sense, nor will $700,000 to hire two new staff. Be certain that everything in your proposal is accounted for in your budget. Conversely, omit budget details that aren’t fully explained in the proposal narrative. 

5. BE READY

Foundations are wary of all-or-nothing funding strategies, especially when pressed by more requests than they can fund. If you’re asked the question, “What will you do if we only support part of your request?” be ready with a credible fallback position that shows how your work will go forward with partial funding. 

6. BE GRATEFUL

There’s no need to gush or order flowers, but send a thank-you note to the program officer, whether you receive funding or not. Since he or she worked on your behalf, letting them know you recognize and appreciate their advocacy solidifies the feeling of relationship, which is central to good fundraising now or in the future. 

7. BE PUNCTUAL

Get your reports in on time, as this clearly demonstrates competence, respect, good planning, and success. When you force the funder to chase you to comply with the contract you signed, you’re establishing a counter-productive dynamic. Most funders have long memories. 

8. BE FORTHCOMING

We live in an imperfect world, and sometimes you’ll fail to do what you said you would. Don’t duck talking about the unforeseen or unexpected. Point out what happened differently from what you had planned or hoped for, and give specific reasons why this was the case. Don’t make excuses; just be matter-of-fact about the various outcomes, both planned for and not. 

CLOSING THOUGHTS 

In closing, I’ll add Don’t Beat Yourself Up. Keep in your mind, no matter what others may say, that you’re employed to do the best you can making funding requests. But it is your organization, with its board, staff, and program, that is the applicant. If successful, you did your component of the group’s work well. If funding didn’t come through, that doesn’t mean you did poor work. It means the foundation said no. Ultimately, getting funded is a result of the entire organization’s efforts. You’re but one element. 

 

By Martin Teitel, former CEO of the Cedar Tree Foundation in Boston, is author of the newly updated edition of The Ultimate Insider’s Guide to Winning Foundation Grants, from which this article is adapted.

Source: GuideStar Blog

February 15, 2019

High-Impact Volunteer Engagement: Six Factors for Success

2.21.19 High-Impact Volunteer Engagement Raw

If you are like most nonprofits, your organization is often strapped for capacity. In fact, on average, most nonprofits spend a mere 2% of their budget to support key operations like marketing, technology, or human resources, while peers in the corporate sector typically invest upwards of 35% of their budget on these functions.

Engaging skilled volunteers (also known as pro bono service) can be an effective way to bridge the capacity gap. It's important to recognize volunteers aren’t “free” and in order for skilled volunteerism to be effective, your organization must be ready to make the most of this valuable contribution of time and talent.

 

Six key factors have been identified to help you determine whether your nonprofit is ready to engage skills-based volunteers:

  1. Strong executive leadership: An engaged leader will not only inspire the volunteer team to connect with your organization’s mission but also ensure access to the support and resources necessary to a project’s success.
  2. Potential to create deep social impact: Organizations poised to create deep social impact make great candidates for skilled volunteer projects. A nonprofit with a strategic direction and measured outcomes can engage skills-based volunteers in contributing meaningful impact toward social change, which supports not only the organization’s mission, but also volunteer enthusiasm for the project.
  3. Effective relationship building: Skills-based volunteering requires partnership across sectors, so the ability to work with individuals and organizations from different cultures, sectors, and industries is crucial to a project’s success. Additionally, by fostering individual relationships with volunteers, your organization can create long-term champions, develop new corporate relationships, and potentially unlock new funding streams.​​​​​​​
  4. Organizational stability: Before engaging skilled volunteers, a nonprofit should be in a position of financial and operational stability. While no volunteer expects perfection from their nonprofit partner, and often the pro bono project can help build financial or operational capacity, the organization should not be in a period of staff or management transition or experiencing significant board turn-over. Without this stability, it is challenging to align a skilled volunteer project with an organization’s strategic direction, allocate the necessary resources to managing the project, and ensure the long-term sustainability of its outcomes.
  5. Commitment to capacity building: Since skills-based volunteerism focuses on building internal organizational infrastructure (i.e. not direct service activities), a nonprofit’s commitment to ongoing capacity building is essential. This commitment should start with senior leadership to ensure that your organization is willing to devote resources toward managing, implementing, and sustaining the results of your pro bono project.
  6. It takes time and resources to provide a positive volunteer experience. Nonprofits that evaluate volunteer experiences and plan for strategic volunteer engagement (including when to say “no” to support) will understand how to put volunteer time and talent to the best use possible to maximize the impact of your pro bono project.

By Jackie Hodgson, Common Impact

Join Candid and Common Impact on February 21, 2019 at 2:00 pm ET for the High-Impact Volunteer Engagement: Developing Effective Capacity Building Projects webinar, to learn more about these six factors for engaging in successful skills-based engagements along with an introduction on how to scope the right-sized project for your organization. Participants will receive Common Impact's Project Portfolio and Scoping Template to help them think through ways to identify organizational challenges and narrow them down into skills-based projects. In advance of the webinar, we encourage you to work through the Common Impact Organizational Readiness Wizard to understand key areas where your nonprofit may need support and prepare questions for the live, online training.

 

February 13, 2019

Meet Your Fundraising Needs with FDO as Your Partner

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You need the best prospecting tool available, Foundation Directory Online is committed to meeting your needs as a fundraiser.

Last year was a big year for FDO, we added nearly 70,000 new grants each week – that is a lot of data in one year! Good news, we are aiming for even bigger records in 2019.

Your organization is doing important work; enabling your success is our mission.

To learn more about FDO, check out our handy guide.

February 05, 2019

Some Big News: Foundation Center & GuideStar Have Joined Forces!


Candid+tagline-300px_goldWe’re excited! Foundation Center and GuideStar have joined forces to become Candid.

First things first: Foundation Directory Online will remain unchanged. You’ll still experience the same great prospecting tool you rely on to win funding, and the same high levels of customer service.

 

Why, then, have we joined forces to become Candid?

The answer is pretty simple: Foundation Center and GuideStar have always been committed to the same thing: empowering individuals and organizations with the insights to change the world. Together, our combined experience and expertise will allow us to do more than ever before.  

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We want to reassure our valued FDO subscribers that we remain as dedicated as ever to ensuring you have the best funding research tool available, continue to:

  • Improve FDO so you find the funding you need to power your work
  • Tap into funding insights from 14 million+ grants
  • Get access to Foundations, including Corporate funders and Public charities
  • Find your best matched funders based on your specific mission
  • Discover new prospecting opportunities from 700,000+ Recipient profiles*
  • Leverage FDO’s LinkedIn integration to build that connection

 

For more information head to candid.org or email us.

 

*Available with FDO Professional

January 14, 2019

NEW My FDO: Tools to Help you Manage Your Prospects

NEW My FDO is our first of many new feature launches for 2019! Make the most out of your prospect research, explore the benefits of My FDO.

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Grantseeking made easier with My FDO’s ability to help you manage your:

  • Tags
  • Saved Searches
  • Alerts
  • NEW Grantmaker Assessment Tool
  • Grant proposal tasks and due dates
  • Plus more!

image from image.send.foundationcenter.org

 

🚀 Take your prospecting to the next level, rate your Grantmakers with the NEW Grantmaker Assessment tool. Simply complete your personal assessment of the Grantmaker -  this rating will live on their profile. You can start straight from the Grantmaker profile.

 

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My FDO is your new workspace, better tools built to help you win the funding you need to succeed.

Happy fundraising!

December 17, 2018

Planned Giving Success: Strategies to Maximize Donor Gifts

20181217 giving blogDuring the eight years I’ve been a consultant, I’ve worked mainly with social justice nonprofit organizations with budgets of $5 million or less. These groups typically have one, or if they’re larger, up to three full-time development staff members. They’re stretched thin generating resources to meet their organizations’ immediate needs. Few have time to focus on a long-term fundraising vision or to invest in planned giving, due to limited staff capacities and resources.

These organizations may think encouraging planned gifts is a good idea, but there’s usually something else that takes precedence, like writing grant proposals and overseeing major gift campaigns.  

I get it. In a small development shop, raising money for current programmatic expenses is priority one. You, too, may have thought your organization should start a planned giving program. But you may be paralyzed about moving forward because of the seeming complexity of legacy gifts. Or you can’t imagine talking with donors about estate gifts without feeling crass.  

On January 24th, I’ll be leading a Foundation Center planned giving webinar that will address these barriers and hopefully move your organization forward into launching a planned giving effort. There are simple steps even small, grassroots groups can take to encourage legacy gifts. Below are some of the strategies I’ll outline in the webinar that can support your efforts.

Develop a Planned Giving Case for Support

A planned giving case for support focuses on why your organization should exist decades from now. Many of our organizations address complex problems that will take more than a lifetime to solve. Other groups focus on issues that may be resolved in the foreseeable future. Groups that work on entrenched challenges or that have evergreen appeal (like arts, education, and health) are in a stronger position to make the case they’ll need to thrive in 50 years.

Pitch for Support from Your Best Matched Funders

Once you have developed your case for planned giving support, next step is to propose this plan to your best matched funders. Use FDO to manage your list of past funders or find new funders. In FDO, you’ll easily be able to see how much a grantmaker supports your specific mission, use this handy tool to prioritize your prospects.

Develop Bequest Language

The vast majority of legacy gifts to nonprofit organizations are made through living trusts and wills. Some of your donors or their attorneys may contact you for language they can include in these documents to designate an estate gift to your organization. It’s simple to have that language ready for such inquiries.

Create a Planned Giving Page on Your Organization’s Website

When donors are creating or revising an estate plan, it should be easy for them to find the information they’ll need to make a legacy gift to your organization. Set up a page on your group’s website to provide basic information (like bequest language) supporters will need to include your organization in their plans.

Form a Legacy Society

Naming an organization as a beneficiary in an estate plan is a significant decision. Let your universe of supporters know that you’ve created a legacy society to recognize donors who have remembered your group in their plans. A legacy society is a way to encourage donors to tell you about their estate gift intentions.  

Setting up a basic planned giving infrastructure will facilitate your supporters to make estate gifts. Once you start learning of intended legacy gifts, you’ll want to do all you can to deepen your relationships with these special supporters.  

Make sure to join me in the upcoming January 24, 2019 webinar, Planned Giving Success: Strategies to Maximize Donor Gifts, to learn more about establishing strategies and systems to strengthen donor relationships and encourage legacy gifts, so you’re well equipped for planned giving success.

 

Stan Yogi - Senior Consultant Klein & Roth Consulting

 

About Stan Yogi: More than 28 years of experience with nonprofit organizations in fundraising and grantmaking. He was Director of Planned Giving at the ACLU of Northern California for 14 years, where he was also responsible for securing foundation grants and raising major annual gifts. Prior to joining the ACLU staff, he was a Program Officer for California Humanities, a statewide organization that awards grants for cultural and educational programs. He is the co-author of the award-winning books, Wherever There's a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California (Heyday, 2009) and Fred Korematsu Speaks Up (Heyday, 2017).

November 08, 2018

Expand Your International Organization’s Presence to Attract U.S. Funders

607493026-blogDuring my 10 years teaching and training nonprofits around the world, I have found that some of the biggest challenges they grapple with in seeking funding are related to differentiating themselves from the plethora of other great causes in the market; establishing their legitimacy in a field in which the few fraudulent ones have created fear, uncertainty and doubt in the minds of donors; and identifying which donors could potentially be interested in their cause, have the capacity to give and are accessible.

If you ask any group of U.S.-based foundations their primary source of information about a nonprofit with which they are unfamiliar most of them will likely say that they google to find out about them.  In the case of international nonprofits looking to raise funds in the U.S., the strength of their digital presence is critical in that it helps to convey the credibility of the organization, in the absence of a physical location the U.S. for funders to easily visit.  

In a market that has over 1.5 million nonprofits, international nonprofits looking to differentiate themselves without the advantage of having operations or programming in the U.S. need to leverage digital channels to convey their unique value proposition to compel support.  An effective digital presence for any nonprofit organization conveys a sense of trustworthiness, authenticity and clarity of purpose to the funders.

International nonprofits also need to be able to utilize resources available to them online, such as GrantSpace, to learn about the U.S.-based foundations that would potentially be interested in funding them. FDO is a key resource to discovering U.S. funders and unlocking the giving priorities of U.S. foundations that may be aligned with the causes of international nonprofits. Finding out who among them are aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as SDG Funders, can help nonprofits to engage with funders online, as a means to potentially enter into their respective grantmaking processes.

Additionally, international nonprofits seeking to access U.S.-based foundations most likely need to establish a presence in the U.S., given that almost 70% of U.S. grants are made to U.S.-based intermediaries, whereas only 12% of them are made directly to international organizations in their local countries (source).  There are four paths international nonprofits can take to legally access U.S.-based funding:

  1. Equivalency Determination
  2. Expenditure Responsibility
  3. Fiscal Sponsorship
  4. Establishment of a 501(c) 3 organization

In the November 15th webinar, Expand Your International Organization’s Presence to Attract U.S. Funders, I will draw on my experience working with international nonprofits and helping nonprofits to establish their presence in the U.S. and online, to provide some you with practical strategies and tips to enable your international nonprofit to most effectively access U.S.-based foundations and to put its best foot forward when engaging with them. Register today!

 

Elizabeth Ngonzi

Adjunct Faculty, New York University Center for Global Affairs

Elizabeth Ngonzi is an experienced executive, award-winning human rights advocate, and seasoned educator dedicated to enabling youth and women worldwide to reach their full potential. She does so by developing platforms that enable them to reach their potential. Learn more about Elizabeth Ngonzi here.

October 08, 2018

Partners in Philanthropy: How to Work with Donor-Advised Funds

Last year, Giving USA’s Annual Report called donor-advised funds (DAFs) one of the “hottest topics in the philanthropic community.”1 Between 2007 and 2016, assets in donor-advised funds nationwide skyrocketed from $32 billion to $85 billion,2 and this trend continues today. Who uses DAFs? How can your nonprofit collaborate with DAF advisors to meet your goals? I explore these questions below.

WHAT IS A DONOR-ADVISED FUND?

A donor-advised fund is a giving tool that charitable individuals use to tax-effectively consolidate, accrue, and grant assets to public charities. You can think of it as an investment account dedicated solely to your charitable giving.

Donor-advised funds are managed by sponsoring organizations, which are themselves 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Sponsoring organizations generally fall into three categories: community foundations, single-issue organizations, or national organizations, such as Vanguard Charitable.

HOW DOES A DONOR-ADVISED FUND WORK?

  1. A donor contributes to a DAF and takes an immediate tax deduction. The charitable assets now legally belong to that DAF’s sponsoring organization. The donor, and other named individuals, often become a DAF advisor.
  2. The DAF advisor can recommend how the assets in the DAF are invested; proceeds grow tax-free.
  3. The DAF advisor can recommend grants to the nonprofits he or she wishes to support. The sponsoring organization will conduct due diligence and, if that research shows the organizations are eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions, issue the grants to the charities.

Note that specific policies vary by sponsoring organization—most donors weigh the different options before opening a DAF.

Donor-advised-funds-from-Vanguard

(Image credit: Vanguard Charitable)

WHY DO DONORS USE A DONOR-ADVISED FUND?

1. Convenience: Instead of having to personally track all their giving, advisors can use DAFs as a centralized hub to simplify their philanthropy. One contribution can fund multiple donations to an advisor’s favorite charity or charities.

2. Increased giving potential: Assets in a DAF are invested tax-free, enabling many advisors to grant much more to charity in the long run.

3. Flexibility: In the wake of crises such as last year’s hurricanes, DAF advisors can respond quickly. Charitable resources in a DAF are “primed” and ready for rapid disbursal.

4. New charitable assets: Most sponsoring organizations can accept donations of non-cash assets such as appreciated securities. These often-overlooked charitable assets pull additional resources into the philanthropic community.

WHO GIVES THROUGH DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS?

With nearly 1,000 sponsoring organizations and more than 280,000 individual DAFs,3 some with multiple advisors, it is hard to generalize about this diverse philanthropic population. A DAF advisor may be a retiree who opened a DAF so that he or she could continue giving after leaving work. Or, a DAF advisor may have found a private foundation to be too costly and burdensome, and opted for a cheaper giving tool with more flexibility. Many DAFs are advised by families who have pooled their charitable resources and view philanthropy as a communal endeavor.

The average DAF advisor in the United States has roughly $300,000 in his or her account,4 and nonprofits report that gifts from DAFs tend to be larger than their typical contributions. The average gift from a Vanguard Charitable advisor, for example, is nearly $12,000.

In removing the administrative burdens of charitable giving, DAFs allow their advisors to pursue a comprehensive, long-term strategy. For nonprofits, this means your donors with DAFs may well be repeat givers. At Vanguard Charitable, the vast majority of our advisors are involved in philanthropy beyond financial contributions. Ninety percent of our advisors also volunteer, serve on a board, or otherwise lend expertise, time, or resources.5

Anonymity is a concern for some nonprofits working with DAF advisors. However, only 5 percent of Vanguard Charitable grants are anonymous.6 The remaining 95 percent allow nonprofits to engage in some form of stewardship.

WHAT ARE DAF ADVISORS LOOKING FOR IN NONPROFITS?

Vanguard Charitable advisors often discuss the best way to identify charities doing meaningful work in their area of interest.

One way that you can distinguish your organization from similar ones is to provide comprehensive and up-to-date information to GuideStar. Vanguard Charitable is one of more than 200 sites and programs that share GuideStar Nonprofit Profile information with their users. DAF advisors appreciate transparency, as additional information enables them to make more informed, strategic decisions. Maintaining an updated GuideStar profile can pay dividends: As they research charities to support, Vanguard Charitable advisors make more than 15,000 searches each month via the GuideStar National Nonprofit Directory.

HOW TO MAXIMIZE YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS

Generally, nonprofits cannot solicit gifts directly from sponsoring organizations, but there are many ways you can strengthen your relationship with DAFs:7

  1. Actively promote your ability to accept grants from DAFs. Consider mentioning donor-advised funds on your website, in solicitation offers, and on promotional materials. You can also suggest that your donors with DAFs set up automatic recurring grants.
  2. Educate your entire organization about gifts from DAFs so that they can be processed smoothly. Remember: DAF advisors are interested in efficiency and convenience! For example, you should not send a tax receipt to DAF advisors, as they’ve already received one from the sponsoring organization, but you may send a thank-you letter to help stay connected.
  3. Steward sponsoring organizations. Don’t send them solicitation letters, but have a working knowledge of prominent sponsoring organizations. Feel free to send them an acknowledgment letter when you receive a gift.
  4. Be familiar with IRS rules concerning DAFs. Grants from a DAF cannot result in impermissible benefit to the DAF account advisors, their family members, or the donor to the DAF account. Grants must be made exclusively for charitable purposes. Vanguard Charitable includes language with each grant to help you understand how the funds can be used.

OUR DONORS ARE YOUR DONORS

I like to tell nonprofits to think of us as members of the same team. Our donors are your donors, and our mission is to increase philanthropy in the United States and maximize its impact over time. We cannot do this without you and your vital work. Together we can continue to help create a better world.

 

Rebecca Moffett is Vanguard Charitable’s Chief Strategic Planning Officer. Rebecca is focused on building awareness of the benefits of strategic philanthropy and is committed to improving donors' giving experiences. In her charitable endeavors, Rebecca is an alumnus of Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Eastern Pennsylvania and is also active in her church community. She earned her bachelor's degree and MBA from Saint Joseph's University.

Original post on Guidestar.

September 17, 2018

Explore New Funding Prospects with Recipient Profiles

 

Leverage Grant Recipient profiles:

  • Discover new funding opportunities
  • Help shape your prospecting strategy
  • Quickly gain fundraising insights

 

 

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Recipient Profiles help you discover new prospects you may have missed in your grant search and help you understand how to approach funders. Now you can easily gather key fundraising insights using FDO’s interactive Recipient Charts. You can access Recipient Profiles and all insights on grant recipients in FDO Professional.

View the data in Recipient Charts by Grant Amounts or Number of Grants using the toggle bar.

 

[Tip 1] Who's funding your mission?

Recipient Charts give you quick insights on the types of funders giving to your mission.

 

[Tip 2] Where are relevant funders located?

View the proximity of funders giving to peers from as close as the same city, town, or region (neighboring states) to as far as another country.

 

[Tip 3] How large are grants awarded to your cause?

Understand how much funders are giving to peers and the size of those grants to see how much those funders most commonly give. Use this chart to help inform you on how much to request.

 

Get Started-blog

 

Video-icon-blogSee more on FDO’s recipient profiles>

 

Turn Insights Into Action, Connect with Funders

 

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Ready to take the next step in your grant search? Now that you’ve had some time to search for prospects and started building your prospect list, use these three steps to convert prospects to funders.

 

[Tip 1] Start with Who’s Who

Review the list of staff and affiliations within your chosen grantmaker profiles by navigating to the Who’s Who section of the grantmaker profile.

 

[Tip 2] Leverage FDO to connect with funders

See who you’re connected to at the foundation with FDO’s LinkedIn integration. The LinkedIn icon will appear next to staff you are connected to—click on the LinkedIn icon to open their profile from FDO (functionality accessible in Professional only). To see your connections to grantmakers make sure you’re also signed in to LinkedIn. 

 

[Tip 3] Reach out to prospects

Look beyond searching for open RFPs and connect with funders who fit your work and mission. Understand funders’ priorities and start cultivating partnerships. Introductions are one of the most effective ways to open the door with a new funder.

Have you tried these FDO top tips on how to approach funders? Take the next step and reach out to funders that match your organization’s mission and program. You can also apply these best practices and view this FDO sample outreach letter from our development expert.

 

Get Started-blog

 

Video-icon-blogSee FDO’s LinkedIn Integration in action>